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Telemedicine is available for south jersey residents who are current patients. Click here for more info.Rowan Medicine is committed to keeping the community informed as the coronavirus situation continues to unfold. Below on this page are a list of frequently asked questions. You can also find links to important resources below. This information will be regularly updated.

What is Coronavirus Disease 2019?

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a respiratory disease first detected in Wuhan, China. There are now cases around the world, including the United States. There are many types of human coronaviruses, including some that cause mild upper-respiratory illnesses. COVID-19 is a new disease not previously seen in humans. 

While the CDC considers this to be a serious public health concern, the CDC believes the immediate health risk to the general American public is low.

How to take care of yourself

There is no vaccine to prevent COVID-19, and there are no medications approved to treat it. That means the best strategies to prevent the spread of the disease are common-sense actions everyone can take.   

  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth.
  • Stay home when you are sick.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash, and disinfect your hands.
  • If you don’t have a tissue, cough or sneeze into the inside of your elbow.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipe. Disinfectant spray and wipes, and hand sanitizer are available to the University community through the Dean of Students Office.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after using the bathroom, before eating, and after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing.
  • If soap and water are not readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • The illness is more severe in people with underlying health conditions. The CDC recommends getting a flu shot, if you haven’t already been immunized against the flu.

Prevent Illness Wash Your hands, 20 secs, wash palms, backs, nails, between fingers and wrists, Rinse with water and dry with paper towel

Coronavirus Disease 2019 FAQ

(updated March 6)

 
COVID-19 is a respiratory illness caused by a coronavirus strain first detected in Wuhan, China. There are many types of human coronaviruses, including some that cause mild upper-respiratory illnesses. COVID-19 is a new disease not previously seen in humans.

Common signs of infection include:

  • Fever
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath

In severe cases, particularly in people with underlying severe and chronic health conditions, the infection can cause pneumonia, severe acute respiratory syndrome, and death.

Since it is cold and flu season, and the virus has similar symptoms, do not make assumptions. If you feel unwell, contact your family health provider.

Based on what is known about similar coronaviruses, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention believes COVID-19 spreads mainly from person to person:

  • Between people who are in close contact with one another (within about six feet).
  • From respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes.
  • Possibly from touching a surface or object that has the virus on it, and then touching the mouth, nose or eyes.
People are thought to be most contagious when they are most sick. Some spread might be possible before people show symptoms; there have been reports of this with this new coronavirus.

The incubation period is the time between exposure to a pathogen and the appearance of first symptoms.

The CDC believes at this time that symptoms of COVID-19 may appear in as few as two days or as many as 14 days after exposure. This is based on the incubation periods for similar viruses.

While the CDC considers this to be a serious public health concern, based on current information, the immediate health risk to the general American public is considered low.

At this time, there is no vaccine to protect against COVID-19, and there are no medications approved to treat it. That means the best strategies to prevent the spread of the disease are common-sense actions everyone can take.

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Stay home when you are sick.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash, and disinfect your hands. If you don’t have a tissue, cough or sneeze into the inside of your elbow.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.
  • If you haven’t already been immunized against the flu, get a flu shot.

The CDC does not recommend the routine use of respirators or face masks among the general public.

If you see someone wearing a mask, do not assume that they are at risk. There are reasons for wearing a mask that have nothing to do with COVID-19. 

Stigma is associated with a lack of knowledge about how COVID-19 spreads, a need to blame someone, fears about disease and death, and gossip that spreads rumors and myths.

People can fight stigma and help others by providing social support. Counter stigma by learning and sharing facts. Communicating the facts that viruses do not target specific racial or ethnic groups and how COVID-19 actually spreads can help stop stigma.